24th July 2014

Quote reblogged from Isolato with 85 notes

May she shatter his weapons on the field of battle and conflict; may she create confusion (and) revolt for him! May she strike down his warriors, (and) water the earth with their blood! May she throw up a heap of his warriors’ bodies on the plain; may she show his warriors no mercy!
— request to Inanna in the Epilogue to the Code of Hammurabi (trans. JB Pritchard)

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Eternal Little Goddess with 66 notes

mini-girlz:

Strap fitting in the form of a nude female, perhaps the goddess Ishtar.
Near Eastern, Mesopotamian, Babylonian, Old Babylonian Period, 1894–1595 B.C.
Height x width: 13 x 5 cm (5 1/8 x 1 15/16 in.)
Bronze
via > educators.mfa.org

mini-girlz:

Strap fitting in the form of a nude female, perhaps the goddess Ishtar.

Near Eastern, Mesopotamian, BabylonianOld Babylonian Period1894–1595 B.C.

Height x width: 13 x 5 cm (5 1/8 x 1 15/16 in.)

Bronze

via > educators.mfa.org

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from And I believe in the Serpent and the Lion... with 86 notes

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from به یاد باد صبا ˷ be yade bade saba with 122 notes

badesaba:

Reclining Woman, 1595 
Reza Abbasi (1565-1635) 

badesaba:

Reclining Woman, 1595 

Reza Abbasi (1565-1635) 

24th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from This Is My Middle Finger with 120 notes

thegreatll:

Christina Balit, Ishtar and Tammuz

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from به یاد باد صبا ˷ be yade bade saba with 164 notes

badesaba:

Reclining Woman
Reza Abbasi,17th c

badesaba:

Reclining Woman

Reza Abbasi,17th c

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from serendipitous finds with 149 notes

massarrah:

Bowl Dedicated to the Goddess Inanna
An alabaster bowl dedicated by a merchant named AK-Enlil to the goddess Inanna, whose name is written in the far right column. The inscription is in Sumerian.
Inanna (or Inana) is the Sumerian name of the goddess Ishtar, the goddess of love and war, and one of the more complicated deities in the Mesopotamian pantheon. In the early period from which this vase comes, she is usually listed in the top tier of the pantheon after Anu and Enlil.
Nippur, Early Dynastic IIIa (c. 2600-2500 BCE).
Metropolitan Museum of Art. Image from CDLI.

massarrah:

Bowl Dedicated to the Goddess Inanna

An alabaster bowl dedicated by a merchant named AK-Enlil to the goddess Inanna, whose name is written in the far right column. The inscription is in Sumerian.

Inanna (or Inana) is the Sumerian name of the goddess Ishtar, the goddess of love and war, and one of the more complicated deities in the Mesopotamian pantheon. In the early period from which this vase comes, she is usually listed in the top tier of the pantheon after Anu and Enlil.

Nippur, Early Dynastic IIIa (c. 2600-2500 BCE).

Metropolitan Museum of Art. Image from CDLI.

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Babylon Chronicle with 193 notes

tammuz:

The Star of Ishtar, a Babylonian symbol, depicted on a clay plaque from ancient Babylonia. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.   
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

tammuz:

The Star of Ishtar, a Babylonian symbol, depicted on a clay plaque from ancient Babylonia. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.   

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

24th July 2014

Quote reblogged from DE ZONDVLOED KOMT... with 255 notes

With your strength, my lady, teeth can crush flint.
— Enheduanna (23rd Century B.C.) - “Nin-Me-Sharra” (“The Exultation unto Inanna”). First named woman in history and also possibly the first author of any gender whose name is known.  (via zondvloed)

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Legacy of Tiamat with 273 notes

ancient-mesopotamia:

The legend, written in Akkadian, describes how Ishtar, goddess of sexuality and warfare, went to the Underworld. Ishtar decided to undertake the journey, although the Underworld was known as the ‘land of no return’ for humans and gods alike. On the way down she passes through seven doorways and each time the gatekeeper removes from her the symbols and clothes of her divinity. Eventually Ishtar comes face to face with Erishkigal, the goddess of death, and collapses. All sexual activity stops on earth. The gods are distraught and Ea, god of wisdom, creates an impotent boy who is attractive to Erishkigal. He manages to persuade Erishkigal to have Ishtar sprinkled with the waters of life and revived. Ishtar passes back through the seven doors, and regains her clothing and attributes. 
Neo-Assyrian era, 7th century BCE, from Nineveh, northern Iraq, part of the library of King Ashurbanipal, 669-631 BCE. (The British Museum, London).

ancient-mesopotamia:

The legend, written in Akkadian, describes how Ishtar, goddess of sexuality and warfare, went to the Underworld. Ishtar decided to undertake the journey, although the Underworld was known as the ‘land of no return’ for humans and gods alike. On the way down she passes through seven doorways and each time the gatekeeper removes from her the symbols and clothes of her divinity. Eventually Ishtar comes face to face with Erishkigal, the goddess of death, and collapses. All sexual activity stops on earth. The gods are distraught and Ea, god of wisdom, creates an impotent boy who is attractive to Erishkigal. He manages to persuade Erishkigal to have Ishtar sprinkled with the waters of life and revived. Ishtar passes back through the seven doors, and regains her clothing and attributes. 

Neo-Assyrian era, 7th century BCE, from Nineveh, northern Iraq, part of the library of King Ashurbanipal, 669-631 BCE. (The British Museum, London).

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from the M!RROR in the tree with 517 notes

leradr:

Ishtar, who is the planet Venus, with her eight-pointed star, with the moon god Sin and the sun god Shamash 

leradr:

Ishtar, who is the planet Venus, with her eight-pointed star, with the moon god Sin and the sun god Shamash 

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Legacy of Tiamat with 580 notes

ancient-mesopotamia:

The figure could be an aspect of the goddess Ishtar, Mesopotamian goddess of sexual love and war, or Ishtar’s sister and rival, the goddess Ereshkigal who ruled over the Underworld, or the demoness Lilitu, known in the Bible as Lilith. The plaque probably stood in a shrine. 
Old Babylonian era, 1800-1750 BCE, from southern Iraq (place of excavation is unknown), Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum, London).

ancient-mesopotamia:

The figure could be an aspect of the goddess Ishtar, Mesopotamian goddess of sexual love and war, or Ishtar’s sister and rival, the goddess Ereshkigal who ruled over the Underworld, or the demoness Lilitu, known in the Bible as Lilith. The plaque probably stood in a shrine. 

Old Babylonian era, 1800-1750 BCE, from southern Iraq (place of excavation is unknown), Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum, London).

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from with 1,266 notes

uromancy:

Roberto Ferri. Ishtar. 2014.

uromancy:

Roberto Ferri. Ishtar. 2014.

24th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from уйди. with 6 notes

everythingcentralasia:

Look Spotter at Kazakhstan Fashion Week April 2014.

Source: everythingcentralasia

24th July 2014

Video reblogged from Ithobaal with 3 notes

numantinecitizen:

Korpiklaani - Paljon On Koskessa Kiviä